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Chilli Cherry Ripe

Chilli Cherry Ripe

It’s coming to the time of year where I always like to have a few little things around the house that can make nice little gifts for people…dropping into neighbours houses, drinks parties and the like. It’s probably not the best idea for my waistline, but most of the time I like giving edible gifts – that way, if you don’t use them, you get to eat the spoils!  Or, in this case, I got to taste the odd shaped ones that didn’t look so good in their bags…

Master just turned 6 is just about to finish kinder and become a big Prep boy next year.  We held him back last year for a variety of reasons – best thing we ever did.  His teachers have been truly phenomenal so to express our thanks I always like to create a little something for them at the end of the year.  Last year I did a hamper with body products – salt scrubs, bath salts, sugar scrubs, and a few food items – some vanilla sugar and a fabulous All Purpose Spice Rub, along with a bottle of bubbles for good measure.  This year I’ve gone all food – pastilla, dukkah, vanilla extract, some home grown bay leaves and kaffir lime leaves, nougat and the delicious Chilli Cherry Ripe. Oh, and a bottle of bubbles as well.

For my overseas followers, a Cherry Ripe is an Australian confectionery item. In fact, one I owe the grand sum of $58,000 to.  You see, last year I was on “Million Dollar Minute”, and one of the final questions for me to win was “What is the colour of the writing on a Cherry Ripe pack?”.  Luckily I have downed enough of these bad boys in my life time to be able to tell you what it is…  I had to choose from either Red, Yelllow or Green.  Do you know what it is? So, naturally, the Cherry Ripe now holds a very special place in my heart.  And when I saw the recipe for Chilli Cherry Ripe in In The Mix 2, I had to try it.

This is the easiest recipe ever!  Some dark chocolate, some desiccated coconut, some dried cherries and a small amount of chilli flakes.  That’s your ingredients right there. My only hiccough was finding the dried cherries – which I eventually ended up getting at a Health Food store.  I bought the tart ones as I like the way the sourness cuts through the dark chocolate.

Anyway, you blitz your chocolate buds.  I used the Yarra Valley Chocolate Company chocolate this time, which comes in little nibs.  You blitz them for a while and then heat at 50 degrees until all the chocolate is melted, then whiz it around with no heat until the temperature drops to 37 degrees, throw in your dried cherries, coconut (I used shredded rather than desiccated) and chilli flakes.  Whizz it around a bit more, and pour into a lined tin to cool. Bam!  That’s it.  Takes 10 minutes tops and then a couple of hours to harden and set enough for you to break or cut into pieces… taking all the ones you couldn’t possibly put in a nice cellophane bag for your neighbours and eating them yourself!

I used the full two teaspoons of chilli flakes.  It definitely has a warm aftertaste but not too much. I made two batches, which was enough for 8 small bags with a few sneaky pieces for the cook!

Chilli Cherry Ripe makes a great little gift!!

Chilli Cherry Ripe makes a great little gift!!

And.. if you want to know – the answer is yellow!

 
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Posted by on November 28, 2014 in Recipes

 

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Granola Bars

Hello??  Hello?? Yes, it is me.  I’ve been busy – so I’ve been extremely neglectful of my blog and my readers.  So much has happened over the last few months, including the arrival of my new baby – yep, I lashed out and got the new TM5.  Not that I didn’t love my TM31, but the marketing spin got the better of me and I ordered the day they were announced amongst the tumult and the shouting.

I must admit I think I still love my TM31 better than my TM5. Why?  Lots of reasons, which I will detail on a later post.  But if I only had a TM31 I would still be the happiest person on the block.  They are both truly super appliances, but my gut feel is that the TM31 is more for ‘real’ cooks – the TM5 seems to be focussed on idiot proof cooking.

Anyway, I digress.

As Master 5 only has a month left of kinder, my mind has turned to Christmas presents for his teachers.  Last year I concocted a hamper with a bottle of champagne, some barbecue spices, some sea salt scrubs, sugar scrubs, vanilla sugar, bath salts, and quince paste.  This year I want to do something similar, with some different components – I’m contemplating pastilla, dukkah, chilli cherry ripe, vanilla essence (already brewing in the cupboard) and a few other bits and pieces.  So as I was searching through In The Mix 2, I came across this recipe for Granola Bars.  I had a few minutes spare, and everything I needed in the cupboard, so decided to give them a crack.

As it turns out, even if I hadn’t had all the ingredients on hand, this is one of those recipes you can adapt to use what you have on hand.  Great for emptying the pantry out!  And I love that this is nut free, so it’s perfect for Master 5 to bring to kinder or school. In it’s original form it’s also gluten free.

The original recipe calls for: butter, honey, brown sugar, pitted dates, rolled oats, poppy seeds, white chia seeds, ground cinnamon and salt flakes.

Essentially you caramelise the butter, honey and sugar, then add the dates, blitz, then add everything else.  You roll it out to fit a baking tray (mine is about 20 x 25 cm) and bake it for 20 minutes in a 140 degree oven.  Cool and cut into pieces.

The mix on this one is extremely sticky, so I turned it out onto baking paper, put another piece of baking paper on top, and rolled it out to the approximate shape of my tray before dropping it back in and filling in the gaps.

Seriously, this is one of those – this is quicker than going to the supermarket to buy a pack of biscuits – recipes, definitely will be on high rotation at our house.

And the taste?  Think sophisticated honey joy with lots of hidden goodness!

Enjoy!

 

 

Enjoy!

All ready to cut into pieces Dani Valent's Granola Bars

The mixture is really sticky so put another piece of baking paper on top before rolling it out

The mixture is really sticky so put another piece of baking paper on top before rolling it out

Nut free - perfect for lunch boxes!

Nut free – perfect for lunch boxes!

Granola bars - lots of goodness in these babies!

Granola bars – lots of goodness in these babies!

 
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Posted by on November 7, 2014 in Sweet Things

 

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White Chocolate Crisps, Cumin and Cream

White Chocolate Crisps, Cumin and Cream

So, I’ve finally got some time on my hands.

Not that I needed much to whip up these little lovelies.  I’ve stared admiringly at the picture of these in the book and finally got organised enough to make them to go with coffee last night.  Well, I thought I’d got myself organised.

You see, I’d bought some white chocolate.  I know that technically white chocolate isn’t chocolate at all, and I hadn’t seen any really GOOD white chocolate that I wanted to use in this recipe, so I bought a few blocks of the Lindt White Chocolate at the supermarket.  All good.  Except when I went to open it last night and I discovered that in my semi exhausted state I had mistaken milk chocolate for white chocolate… doofus!  I was so intent in getting this recipe made and off my list that I bent to the circumstances and made it – but only used the White Chocolate Melts, which aren’t all that great for recipes like this.

Because I wasn’t working with premium chocolate I must admit I didn’t go the whole hog and make pretty shapes with the chocolate, but the result was actually pretty reasonable even with the dodgy chocolate used. The upside of using the melts was that the chocolate wasn’t quick to melt after the dessert had been assembled, so that was a bonus.

The recipe comes from the amazing Sat Bains.  I’ve been watching him on Great British Menu and I love the way he thinks about food.  Next time I’m in England, I’m going to try and get to his restaurant in Nottingham.  This last trip I managed to get into Heston Blumenthal’s Fat Duck and it was spectacular – everything I hoped for and much, much more.  Such fabulous memories, I can’t wait to try my luck and see if I can manage a sitting at his Melbourne Pop Up later this year.

Really the recipe couldn’t be easier.  Bung in your cumin seed, and the chocolate.  Melt it and whiz it around a but, and then scrape it down a bit.  Pour in onto a silicon sheet or baking paper – I used baking paper on a baking sheet.  Smooth it out with your spatula – as it cools down it gets easier to put nicer patterns on it.

The tricky part comes next – you refrigerate it until it’s just set enough to make an indentation with a cookie cutter that will actually stay – so timing is crucial.  I attempted to fridge a few times before I gave up in disgust at my lack of success and then reverted to just leaving it on the bench so I could keep an eye on how set it was becoming.  Because I was running out of time and figuring I hadn’t used great chocolate for it, I decided to give the fancy shapes the flick and just ran a knife through it to create some rectangles and a few triangles.  Then I refrigerated it to make sure it was set, and because I heeded the warning that it melted rather quickly in the recipe!

I had some great cream in the fridge – it’s the Gippsland Dairy Double Cream.  It’s so thick and luscious I didn’t see the need to whip it – I just used a butter knife and slathered it in between two discs of chocolate and arranged them (very hurriedly) on a plate.

Well, these were quite a delightful little treat.  Certainly something I’d serve again with coffee.  Here’s the thing – I was trying to be good and thought I’d put the merest hint of cream between some of the discs, but I’ve got to say the more cream, the more the flavour of the cumin comes through.  So now you have that on my good authority – go for your life!

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Posted by on June 16, 2014 in Sweet Things

 

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Cucumber, Mint and Lime Sorbet

The cucumber discs really add to the flavour

The cucumber discs really add to the flavour

I’ve been intrigued by this recipe forever – well, since first seeing the recipe in the book and then watching it being made by Dani at a Cooking Class a couple of years ago.  It’s amazing to watch being made – think witches cauldron with smoke everywhere and a brilliant emerald green sorbet.  Stunning, both visually and taste wise.

The dry ice component of this recipe was always going to be the bugbear for me.  It’s not that hard to source, but the fact that you have to buy it, store it and use it within 24 hours was a little too organised for me.

This recipe comes from Pierre Roelofs (see his website at http://www.pierreroelofs.com)  He’s the man behind the weekly Desert Evenings at Cafe Rosamond in Fitzroy.  I’ve just read about them – and I want to go!  Pierre has worked or studied at an impressive array of restaurants all over the world – including doing an internship with my food crush Heston Blumenthal at The Fat Duck.  I adore the way he thinks about food.  And guess what – I’m going to The Fat Duck in less than a month!  I’m sure Heston won’t be there, but I am so excited about tasting the dishes I have heard so much about for so many years.

Dani mentions in the book that you need to collect and use your dry ice on the same day.  Unfortunately the good folk at BOC Preston (where I got my supply) aren’t open on Sunday and in fact close at midday on Saturday.  That wasn’t going to work for me as we have our family dinners on Sunday night. So, I took a gamble and rolled up at about 11.30 Saturday morning with my little polystyrene box under my arm.  If you are planning on making this, then make sure you have an adequately sized container for your dry ice.  I used the polystyrene box that the Bambino Cone ice creams come in – and it was ideal.  The recipe only calls for a few hundred grams of the dry ice, but with the time factor between buying the ice and using it, I erred on the side of caution and bought 2 kilos of the pellets. The container held 2 kilos really well.  More than 24 hours later I still had more than enough for the recipe, even after a reasonably warm Melbourne day.  Rather stoically, I resisted temptation and didn’t even open the box once to take a peek, and then I put the box in another esky and left it in the laundry.

I was given an information sheet when I bought the dry ice, which tells you that in ideal conditions a 5 kilo block of dry ice will last 48 hours.  My advice would be to speak to the experts at the shop and tll them how long it will be before you’re going to use the ice, and they should be able to tell you how much to buy.  Although it seems a little counter intuitive, you don’t store it in the fridge or freezer, just in the esky you have it in.

What the pamphlet doesn’t say, but on the advice of one of my neighbours who deals with dry ice regularly, was that some people can feel a little light headed around dry ice – it’s something to do with the concentrated carbon dioxide.  So take car while it’s in your car, or near you.

So, onto the recipe!

Thankfully, my mint has been rather prolific this year, and I thought I’d have oodles left over, but after about 7 trips out to the herb garden, I finally had the requisite 140 grams of mint leaves, and boy – that’s a lot of mint!!  Just look at the size of the bag that is holding them!

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Luckily, I did the mint leaf part on Saturday afternoon and stored them in a zip lock bag in the fridge.  If you were buying mint from the greengrocers, my bet is that you’d need at least 5 or 6 bunches of it to get the 140g of leaves.  I was pretty fussy and used only leaves, I’m not sure if this impacts on the flavour or not, but it wouldn’t impact on the consistency of the sorbet as you strain it and discard the pul, so you could possibly try adding some stem for the weight.  If you are preparing it in front of guests, then have the mint leaves picked and ready as it takes a long time to pluck them all.

Making the sorbet is really easy.  First you grind down your sugar, the add the cucumber, mint leaves, yoghurt, lime juice and water.  If I had my time again, I would probably add the mint leaves with the sugar and blitz them together as the mint takes up a serious amount of space in the bowl.  I managed to get everything in the thermo bowl – just – but I had put the cucumber in first, and if you put the mint leaves in first and the cucumber on top the you might get away with it.  You don’t have to peel the cucumber at all – just roughly chop it into chunks.

Once that’s blitzed you need to strain it quickly.  I was able to strain mine straight into my indulgent second bowl, but otherwise you’d need to rinse it first.  I used a spatula to stir the liquid through the sieve and it took about ten minutes.  If you take too long, apparently the liquid can discolour.  I wish my sieve was a little finer, but the one I used did the job – just not as thoroughly as I would have liked.  You end up with lots of green that you discard, but the upside is that it smells lovely!

So…the moment of truth came.  The time to add the dry ice and to watch the magic happen!

To be honest, I had scrawled some notes when I watched Dani prepare this dish, and I’d written down “350g dry ice, all at once, higher speed” but I couldn’t remember what I really meant, so I texted Dani,  Her wisdom was, either do it as detailed in the book or try this way – add 350g dry ice all at once and churn on a higher speed.  I decided to do it the way it was detailed in the recipe, and this is what happened:

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Whooooo!  It reminded me somewhat of Heston’s Ejaculating Pudding from his Roman Feast show 😉  It made a hell of a mess, but it was worth it!  My trusty photographer snapped away while I spent about a minute precariously balanced between thrill and mortification.

If you’re doing it the way the recipe says, my recommendation is to get a chilled bowl and weigh your dry ice into that, so you know roughly what quantities you are dealing with.  Make sure you use a spoon, ladle or tongs to sccop it into the bowl or you will burning the living daylights out of your hand.  I found it easier to use a ladle with the pellets (they were roughly the size of the old one cent piece) as the tongs were a little too tricky.

So, in less than a minute, while my kitchen resembled something from Macbeth, the green juice and the dry ice combined to create the most magnificent sorbet.

Dani says you can freeze it up to an hour, which is what I did.  I certainly wouldn’t leave it any longer than that, even though I put mine in a freezing cold bowl, covered it and put it back in the freezer.  Because the freezer is warmer than the dry ice, it went a little mushy for mine. Next time I’ll try the 350g of dy ice all at once, and will make it when I want to serve it. I’ll do it in front of our guests so they can enjoy the theatre of creation, and issue them with aprons just in case it overflows again!

The resulting sorbet is just divine.  The lime really cuts through the mint, and if you eat one of the little cucumber discs that you serve it on, you really enhance the flavour of the cucumber as well.  It’s deliciously smooth – I think from freezing so quickly – and sightly effervescent in your mouth.  Even Master 5 was incredibly impressed – and it’s green!

So, in short – it’s definitely worth tracking down a dry ice supplier, and searching our an insulated container that is just the right size for your stash.  For the record, the box I used was 30cm wide, 20cm long and about 9cm deep.  The BOC man said it would fit about 2 kilos of dry ice.  The dry ice was about $10 a kilo.

Enjoy!

(PS – If you’re the gentleman that I was chatting to in BOC Preston on Saturday – and I’m sorry I forgot to ask your name – I hope this has caught your interest.  Let me know if you’d like a demo!)

 
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Posted by on March 4, 2014 in Sweet Things

 

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Anzac Crack

I’m a cheater.

I had promised to get through every recipe in “In The Mix” before I embarked on my pristine copy of “In The Mix 2”, but a family birthday and continuing hot weather in Melbourne meant I couldn’t make the Cucumber, Mint and Lime Sorbet that I have been wanting to attempt for so long.  I was prepared to risk keeping the dry ice for 24 hours, but with the temperatures we’ve been having here, I just wasn’t that game, so I took a peek into In the Mix 2 and the Anzac Crack grabbed my fancy.

Julia Taylor (think tall, be-spectacled, slender blonde that was a legal secretary…possibly from Brisbane?) from  Australian Masterchef Series in 2012 it to thank for this recipe and – –

Oh. My. God.  This is the bomb!  It’s amazing!The three layers…. base, crack and jelly The best Chocolate Mousse! Julia Taylor's Anzac Crack Absolutely sensational desert!

I made this on the Saturday for a dinner on Sunday night.  I needed something that would keep reasonably as we had my Dad’s party on the Sunday afternoon which meant I would have no prep time on the Sunday for anything.  It kept beautifully and there are still a couple of slices in the fridge which I am working my way through… thank God I’m doing Boot Camp at the moment or I’d be a goner!

The Anzac Base of this cake is beautiful.  The macadamia nuts give it a lovely boost, and it’s great even by itself – the leftover bits didn’t last long at all between the three of us.  I’d be tempted to use this recipe as my Anzac recipe in future.  I have the worst set of springform tins and I was planning on getting some new ones, but I decided with the volume of liquid that this recipe uses, that I’d use my amazing Profiline Push Pan.  I love this tin… definitely worth looking at them if you use springform tins on a regular basis or do things with crusts.  I’m going to lash out and buy a couple of other sizes of them too.  They are completely leak proof and perfect for cheesecakes, or things that need to set.

In an ideal world, I would have already bought a larger push pan, but the one I used was the 22 cm one, and it was fine.

I made the Anzac Base – easy as.  I used raw macadamia nuts and toasted them with the coconut in my new oven (which I also love) until they were a lovely pale gold colour.  I greased and lined with baking parchment my pushpan, even though they are non-stick, I was leaving nothing to chance!  I rolled the Anzac base out between my thermomat and another piece of baking parchment until it was the required 2mm thick, and then stuck it in the freezer for 10 minutes.  It gets pretty stiff pretty quickly, but if you are chilling yours on the thermomat, don’t use a sharp knife to cut your circle – I stole one of Master 5’s Play Doh knives and it worked perfectly and doesn’t damage your thermomat. I baked the leftovers straight afterwards while the oven was still warm.

Next to make was the Crack, which is best described as a cross between butterscotch and caramel.  I was a little weirded out to read that there were breadcrumbs in there, and the only ones I had were some I had blitzed up a few months ago from some leftover wholegrain bread – but surprisingly enough they seemed to work ok.  I did have some egg yolks in the freezer but opted to use fresh egg yolks instead for this component and used my frozen ones for the Chocolate Mousse later on.  This process makes the most gooey, rich, butterscotchy sauce which you pour over the cooked Anzac Base, and then put it in the freezer straight away for at least an hour or until it’s really quite firm.  I took a little break here as I wanted to make sure it was well set before I made the Passionfruit Jelly, as I’ve ruined too many layering deserts in the past by being impatient!  Dani says to put it on a tea towel in the freezer to protect your shelf, which is what I did. I guess you could also put it on a  cold baking sheet in your freezer if you’re worried about it cooling off-balance.

Several hours (and crack cooling time) later, I made the Passionfruit Jelly.  I couldn’t find good fresh passionfruit so I (eek!) used a small tin of the passionfruit pulp from the supermarket.  Sorry, folks.  One day I will grow a passionfruit vine…

The recipe calls for white sugar, which I don’t have any more – we are just a raw sugar household these days – and it was fine.  There was a tiny bit of bloom on the end result, but I’m not sure if that was from the raw sugar or something else, I’ll try this again and see how it goes with white sugar one of these days.  I used the required amount of peel and sliced ginger, I did about 10 – 15 slices with the 2cm, and believe it or not this really infused quite a strong ginger flavour in the jelly, almost overpowering the passionfruit.  Next time I might reduce the amount of ginger that I use to infuse, and see if that is more to my liking.  Don’t get me wrong – it was still awesome, just quite gingery!

I was quite game and took a chance on some frozen egg yolks that I had in the freezer and used them to make the Chocolate Mousse.  They were fine – and this is a wonderfully smooth chocolate mousse.  I poured it into one of Master 5’s tupperware lunch boxes as everything else I had was already in commission, and popped it, lid on, into the crisper (the only place I had room in the fridge) for a few hours… perfect!!

There were a few slices left over – only because we had all eaten too much – and they have been eaten over the last few days.  Master 5 has developed a serious Chocolate Mousse addiction and there has been enough for him to have a little scoop after his dinner the last few days as well, without possibly running me short.

So – get to it!  This is one of the most decadent deserts I’ve had in ages!

 
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Posted by on February 18, 2014 in Sweet Things

 

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Salmon Rillettes

I’ve been wanting to get to this recipe for ages – probably about 2 years – since I dined at PM24 in Melbourne, at the Wedding Reception of one of my friends.  The meal was absolutely one to remember, the bride and groom were deliriously happy and it was a really, truly happy occasion.  I was dismayed to read that PM24 is no longer – but will be relaunched as Lucy Liu’s Kitchen and Bar in the near future.

The weather in Melbourne has been ridiculously hot – and even though one of the best things about cooking with a thermomix is that it doesn’t heat up the kitchen anywhere near as much as a stove does – so my cooking has taken a little break over the school holidays and the heat waves.

We are all salmon fans in our house, so this recipe was one that I knew would be a crowd pleaser.  It kept well for a few days in the fridge and was a lovely light summer meal when served with a green salad and some toasted baguette.  It would also make a lovely light lunch – it will definitely be on my list of considerations for my next luncheon.  Technically it’s listed in the book as an entree, which it would be great for, but my guess is that even divided among eight ramekins it would be too much for an individual entree.

This would be a great recipe to use up left over smoked salmon (if indeed there is such a thing) – I should have thought of making this just after Christmas instead of waiting till the beginning of February.  It’s dead easy to make and is super impressive and tasty.  Make sure you leave yourself enough time to let it set if you are making it for a special occasion.  I used several small ramekins when I transferred mine from the thermomix, covered them with glad wrap and put them in the fridge.

If you have a second thermomix bowl then you can leave out the step where you cool the bowl with ice cubes and just use your second bowl instead.  I must admit, I didn’t get my second bowl until about 12 months ago, after 3 years of Thermo-ownership.  I never thought I’d use one and it does come in handy from time to time.

If you can, choose salmon fillets that are an even size.  They don’t need to look pretty as you’ll end up shredding them anyway. If I had my time again I probably would have been more vigilant when I chopped my smoked salmon, but it still tasted good!

Make sure you use a good wine and vinegar as the flavours really penetrate the salmon.  I used a lovely German Riesling and it was great.  I could have done much better with my vinegar – I must get down to either Pure Italian, Leo’s, or Simon Johnson to get a really good one as I think mine let me down a little.

Definitely use fresh dill.  Wouldn’t you know – after being inundated with dill from my herb garden over the Christmas break, I had to go and buy some – arghhh!  I’d probably use slightly more than 2 tablespoons as I’m a sucker for dill.

I’m not sure what I keep doing wrong, but my clarified butter never turns out perfectly clear.  Next time I’m going to try using a coffee filter instead of the clean, damp kitchen cloth and see if that gives me a better result.

Mine didn’t look quite as broken up as the one in the picture in the book, probably because I was a bit uneven with the breaking up of the salmon into large pieces.  I definitely had on my multitasking hat when I was making this – I had two people over and was talking to them at the same time I was making it – so it really is a doodle to make.

I used a sourdough baguette and toasted it in the oven.  It was delicious and gave me the chance to try my new oven out.  I’ve never been a fan of grilling in the oven, but this worked perfectly and oh so evenly, so I’m now busily planning what my next dishes in the oven will be – I just have to wait for this spell of hot weather to pass!

I served it with a salad of baby spinach, baby roma tomatoes and Persian fetta.  Perfect!

So – what was the verdict?  A resounding yes!

Salmon Rillettes

 
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Posted by on February 12, 2014 in Entrees

 

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Recipe – Herb Scroll

Blogger and restaurateur Madalene Bonvini-Hamel (britishlarder.co.uk) came up with this tasty, filling and attractive bread rolled with a zucchini and herb pesto.  Put the scroll in the middle of a buffet table or picnic spread and watch it disappear, or let the kids rip it apart for their lunchboxes.  The pesto also makes a fresh, light dip, pasta sauce and pizza topping.

Time:  2.5 hours

Serves – 6

Bread Dough

400 grams Baker’s Flour

1 teaspoon chopped rosemary

20 grams fresh yeast, or 1 sachet dried yeast

40 grams olive oil

1 teaspoon salt

200 grams lukewarm water

Weigh the flour, rosemary and yeast in the TM bowl.  Blend for 10 seconds/speed 8.  

Add the oil, salt and water.  Blend for 30 seconds/speed 8, then knead for 1 and a half minutes/interval speed.

Turn the dough onto a lightly floured bench or silicon mat.  Neatly and gently fold the dough into a ball to create a smooth top and wrap it in the silicon mat, or place it in a lightly greased bowl and cover.  Let the dough prove for 40 minutes to 1 hour, or until doubled in size.  Make the pesto while it is rising.

Zucchini and Herb Pesto

30 grams parmesan

30 grams pine nuts

20 grams linseeds

1 clove garlic, peeled

1 small onion, peeled and halved

30 grams baby spinach

40 grams mixed herbs, such as mint, lemon thyme, parsley, basil or oregano

30 grams olive oil

200 grams zucchini, cut into large pieces

juice of 1 lemon

salt and pepper, to taste

100 grams soft goat’s cheese

Place the parmesan in the TM bowl and grate it for 8 seconds/speed 10.  Set aside and wipe the bowl out with kitchen paper.

Place the pine nuts and linseeds in the TM bowl and toast for 4 minutes/100 degrees/Reverse/Speed Soft.  Set aside with the parmesan.

Place the garlic, onion, spinach and herbs in the TM bowl.  Chop for 3 seconds/speed 6.  Add the oil and sauté for 2 minutes/100 degrees/Reverse/Speed 2.  Add the zucchini and chop for 5 seconds/speed 5.

Add the parmesan, toasted pine nuts and linseed, the lemon juice, and salt and pepper to taste.  The mixture must not be too oily or it will make the bread claggy.

Assembly and baking

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees/gas mark 4.  Grease and dust a springform tin about 18-20cm diameter with flour.  Turn the dough onto a lightly floured bench or mat and press or lightly roll it onto a rectangle about 1.5cm thick.

Spread the pesto in a thin layer over the surface. (You’ll use about 2/3 of the pesto, but the remainder will keep for a week in the fridge).  Sprinkle the goat’s cheese over the pesto and roll the dough into a spiral.  Cit it into 6.  Arrange the spirals in the prepared tin.

Bake in the oven for 55 minutes (cover the top with foil if the exposed pesto threatens to burn).  Let the bread cool for 10 minutes before removing it from the tin.

 
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Posted by on August 14, 2013 in Recipes

 

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